Hutchins Award Winners Read at Humanities Symposium

Hutchins contest winners 2018
L to R: Liam McDermott, Lauren Cottle, Jacqueline Karneth, and Gabriela Gonzales.

This past Sunday, these smiling people were celebrated as winners of the Sandra Hutchins Humanities Symposium Writing Competition. The awards are named in honor of a retired Belmont English faculty member, Dr. Sandra Hutchins, longtime creative writing professor and advisor to the Belmont Literary Journal. Below is a list of the winners and the titles of their work.

Poetry:
First place: “Instead” from Jacqueline Karneth
Second place: “Island” from Liam McDermott

Fiction:
First place: “Words Words Words” from Gabriela Gonzales
Second place: “Their Drunken Boat” from Jacqueline Karneth

Creative Nonfiction:
First place: “The Oil Spill” by Lauren Cottle
Second place: “We Thaw” from Jacqueline Karneth

Image Credit: Susan Finch

Nine Inducted into Sigma Tau Delta

PrintLast Wednesday, nine BU English majors were inducted into Sigma Tau Delta, the international English Honors Society. Family, faculty, and friends gathered to watch the cording ceremony. After opening remarks by Sigma Tau Delta sponsor Dr. Charmion Gustke, the honorees were corded by faculty members. Congratulations to these wonderful English majors!

STD_inductees_18
L to R: Samantha Binnie, Rachel Petty, Hope Moore, Zenna Daker, Chris Tully, Lindsey Knapp, Jacqueline Skokna, Audrey Fenstermaker, and Dr. Charmion Gustke
Charmion_Kathleen
Dr. Gustke and Kathleen Albritton

BU English Majors Honored at CLASS Awards Day

This past Monday in the Frist Lecture Hall, nine English majors were honored at the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Awards Day.

The James and Sara King Award, given to “students who have submitted outstanding papers in response to a class assignment” were won by Charlotte Payne, Tom Ebner, and Ben Thomas.

The Ruby P. Treadway Award, given to outstanding students in creative writing, went to Sheyanne Meadows and Audrey Fenstermaker.

Kameron Johnson and Sydney Queen were both honored with The Corinne Dale Award for Achievement in Writing about Gender.

Finally, Rachel Petty won the Virginia Chaney Award, given annually to the outstanding female English major, while Andrew Cox won the Carl Chaney Award, designating the outstanding male English major.

Congratulations to all these outstanding BU English majors!

Student Presentations: How Structure Shows Power

by Victoria Pan

The Belmont Undergraduate Research Symposium, often shortened to just BURS, is a series of presentations to showcase student work. Moderated by an advising faculty member, students form a panel to share their critical analysis in front of their peers. It’s a highly flattering honor, but also nerve-wracking situation.

Not that you would be able to tell, had you attended “Structuring Voice and Identity: How Narratology Informs Power and Suffering,” just last Thursday, on April 20. The panelists, which included Alexandra Huff, Elliott Neal, Amanda Nicklaus, and Rachel Petty, were all utterly composed and ready to share their thoughts.

All four students shared their work from Dr. Caresse John’s Special Studies in Critical Theory course just last fall, focusing particularly on narratology. Narratology is a structuralist approach in which form is divorced from context. Narratologists examine elements like narration, authorship, speech representation, chronology, metanarration, and narrative space.

Continue reading “Student Presentations: How Structure Shows Power”

Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive Launches

By Victoria Pan

For many students, technology and literature exist in two separate spheres, often in opposition to each other. However, for students working on The Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive, this isn’t the case. For these students, led by Dr. Marcia McDonald, Dr. Joel Overall, and Dr. Jayme Yeo over the past year, technology is a means to preserve and learn from artistry found in Nashville.

These students, separated into five groups, were in charge of video editing, interviews, compiling text, and synthesizing information. The project currently encompasses the Nashville Shakespeare Company’s performance of Comedy of Errors and will also include the Hamlet performance coming in the spring of 2018. Their work divides plays into four sections: directing, songwriting, acting, and costuming. The impressive results of all of their hard work can be found at https://shakespeare.belmont.edu/.

However, all of this was inspired by and made possible with the help of Dr. Laura Estill, editor of the World Shakespeare Bibliography and Associate Professor of English at Texas A&M University. During her keynote speech on April 21, she spoke about what inspired her work. Her focus, she said, is in the digital humanities: an ever-fluid field that studies humanities through digital means and specializes in the ways online sources assist and expand scholarship. Shakespeare, in particular, already was a digital phenomenon before the creation of the World Shakespeare Bibliography, and this is only becoming more and more evident. For Dr. Estill, technology helps to bridge the gap between the then of the Elizabethan era with the now of today. Continue reading “Nashville Shakespeare Performance Archive Launches”

Dr. McDowell Delivers Simmons Lecture

by Amanda Nicklaus

On Monday, April 17, students and faculty gathered in the Massey Boardroom to listen to Dr. Gary McDowell speak as part of the Robert E. Simmons Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series. The Series, named in memory of the former Dean of the School of Humanities and Education, provides faculty members in the College of Arts & Sciences an opportunity to share significant research with colleagues. Simmons Lecturers are chosen based on a “high level of teaching and level of accomplishments,” according to current Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Bryce Sullivan. McDowell certainly fits this description. Holding a Ph.D. in American literature, creative writing, and poetry, he is an accomplished author, with publications including seven books, 150 poems, six critical essays, and eleven interviews, as well as having over fifty awards to his name.

Dr. Gary McDowell speaks in Simmons Lecture Series
Dr. Gary McDowell (photo credit: Sam Simpkins)

His lecture, titled “On Being One on Whom Nothing is Lost: A Writer in Search of a Genre,” outlined McDowell’s writing journey as he tried his hand at several different genres. He knew he wanted to tell stories, he said, but a professor in grad school, upon reading one of his short stories, told him bluntly, “You’re not good at this.” She did, however, suggest trying poetry, and McDowell’s love of language moved him forward, this time satisfying his affinity for storytelling through the intentional, colorful language of poetry. Continue reading “Dr. McDowell Delivers Simmons Lecture”

BU English Majors Honored at University Scholarship and Awards Day

At University Scholarship and Awards Day on April 12, Rachel Petty (“A Witness to Suffering: A Narratological Analysis of Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye”) and Hailey Hanks (“No One Would Choose to Die”) were honored as university-wide winners of the Alfred Leland Crabb Award for outstanding academic writing. Congratulations to these outstanding writers!

Scholarship and Awards Day
Rachel Petty receiving her award from Dr. Susan Finch (photography credit: Sam Simpkins)
Scholarship and Awards Day
Hailey Hanks being congratulated by Dr. Finch (photography credit: Sam Simpkins)