English Graduate Students Present at Conferences

Belmont Master of Arts student Lauren Santoru presented at the University of North Carolina Charlotte’s 17th annual English Graduate Student Association conference, “Gender and Diversity across the Disciplines,” held on February 3. Santoru’s paper, entitled “Hawthorne’s Metaphorical Pearl: Embodied Feminine Voice” was a feminist analysis of Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter

Jamey Wood, also a Masters student at Belmont, recently presented his research at the 2017 Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference, which took place February 15-18 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Originating from a project in a digital writing class, Wood’s presentation was titled, “A Dramatist Examination of John Prine’s ‘Sam Stone’” and was given as part of a panel discussion on rhetoric and technical communication.  Wood’s work has also been accepted to a conference that is scheduled to take place this June at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia.

 

 

M.A. Graduate Accepted at UC Irvine

harrellThe Belmont English Department would like to congratulate Meredith Harrell, a recent Masters degree recipient in Belmont’s Graduate English Program. Harrell, who has taught First Year Writing at Belmont and who has tutored in the University Learning Center, was accepted recently into the English Ph.D. program at the University of California, Irvine, where she plans to study Renaissance literature.

Grad Student Publishes in Journal

Belmont MA student Charlsie Johnson recently had her work, “Barrie’s Traditional Woman: Wendy’s Fatal Flaw”  published in the Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research. Johnson’s essay argues that in J.M. Barrie’s novel, Peter and Wendy, Wendy’s struggle with autonomy represents a failed modernity and the return to Victorian femininity.

Grad Student Publishes Poem

Congratulations to Gabriel Seals, whose poem was published in this month’s edition of Tennessee Magazine. Gabriel also won the Sandra Hutchins Humanities Symposium Writing Award in Poetry, an award named after retired Belmont professor, Dr. Sandra Hutchins.

English Faculty and Students Talk Tech at Recent Symposium

Belmont English faculty members played numerous contributing roles in the recent 15th Annual Belmont University Humanities Symposium.  The event, which ran from September 19-26, was titled Titled “Machines Made of Words: Technology, Progress, and the Humanities.” The week-long event sparked a range of conversations about our place as humans in relation to the many technologies around us. Central planning roles were taken on by Dr. David Curtis (symposium) and Dr. Maggie Monteverde (associated film festival), both professors in the English Department. English faculty and graduate students who delivered presentations included the following:

  • ENGAGING “SMART” MACHINES: AI, VR & THE HUMANITIES, panel presentation including Dr. Joel Overall.
  • SHAKESPEARE: FROM ON STAGE TO ONLINE, panel presentation by Dr. Marcia McDonald, Dr. Jayme Yeo and Dr. Joel Overall.
  • THE GREAT GROWLING ENGINE OF CHANGE: VIEWING THE EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY THROUGH LITERATURE, graduate student reading featuring Alyssa Wynans, Grace Miller, Aleks Kojadinovic, and Hannah McIntosh.
  • WHY THINGS MATTER: BEING POSTHUMAN IN THE HUMANITIES, presentation by Dr. Jason Lovvorn.
  • MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN—AND HER MONSTERS, presentation by Dr. David Curtis.
  • “WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE”…YET, viewing and discussion moderated by Dr. Maggie Monteverde.
  • LANGUAGE: ‘THE UNIVERSAL AND BIOLOGICALLY SPECIFIC’ TECHNOLOGY, presentation by Dr. Maggie Monteverde.
  • THERE’S NOT AN APP FOR THAT: WELLNESS, WRITING AND WALKING IN THE DIGITAL AGE, co-presentation including Dr. Bonnie Smith Whitehouse.
  • PRACTICING RESURRECTION: WENDELL BERRY, THE HUMANITIES AND THE PROBLEMATICS OF ELECTRIC WIRE AND SCREENS, presentation by Dr. Annette Sisson.
  • DIGITAL COMPOSING WORKSHOP, conducted by Dr. Joel Overall.
  • 2015 SANDRA HUTCHINS HUMANITIES SYMPOSIUM WRITING COMPETITION READING AND CELEBRATION OF WINNING ENTRIES, moderated by Dr. Gary McDowell and Dr. Susan Finch.
  • SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP: REFLECTING ON TECHNOLOGY AND THE HUMANITIES, moderated by Dr. David Curtis and Dr. Maggie Monteverde.

humanities-symposium

Belmont English Student News

English Majors Interview Shakespeare Acting Company

thumb_the_nashville_shakespeare_festivalStudents in Dr. Marcia McDonald’s Shakespeare class interviewed the cast and crew of the Nashville Shakespeare Festival‘s Comedy of Errors on Thursday, September 23rd. The interviews were conducted as part of a project to create an online archive of local Shakespeare productions. Dr. Joel Overall and MA in English graduate student Alyssa Wynans assisted the students during the interviews. The archive will be housed by Belmont University’s library and is funded by a grant from the Folger Shakespeare Library in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

scroll

 Graduate Students Present at Humanities Symposium

Alyssa Wynans, Hannah McIntosh, Aleksandra Kojadinovic, and Grace Miller presented on the evolution of technology in the humanities at the Belmont University Humanities Symposium. Their papers covered the relationship between technologies and humans in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from online Shakespeare fanfiction to the impact of media and technological devices on self-image and relationships.

Graduate Student Accolades and Events

Gold_Star.svg

from Dr. Jayme Yeo, Director of Graduate Studies in English

  • Belmont BA and MA Alum, Gabriel Briggs (Ph.D., University of Kentucky), recently published his book, The New Negro in the Old South (Rutgers, 2015). His work “redefine[s] our understanding of the idea of the New Negro” by relocating the locus of the development of the New Negro identity in post-Reconstruction Nashville. Briggs is Senior Lecturer in English at Vanderbilt University, where he has worked since 2009.
  • Belmont MA student Alan Tucker was interviewed for Writistry, a podcast series for writers (he’s also won the honor of being called their “new favorite Tennessean!”). Tucker caught the attention of Writistry through his micropoetry, which he posts on Twitter under the handle Micro Tommy (@micro_tommy). You can also catch his regular feed @alandrue, or his blog, Excitable Mind (alandrue.com). Check out the podcast here: https://writistrypodcast.com/
  • John Heacock’s short story, “December Sand” has been named a finalist in the Iowa’s Review’s 2016 Jeff Sharlet Memorial Award for Veterans. His submission was chosen from among 459 other entries for consideration. We have our fingers crossed for you, John!
  • MA Student Sally Anderson wil lbe the featured poet reading at East Side Storytellin’ at 7pm on Tuesday, September 20th. The event is hosted by local bookstore East Side Story, takes place at The Post East (1701 Fatherland Street) and is afterward turned into an hour long podcast. See more: http://eastsidestorytn.com/eastside-storytellin/