Amy Earhart Discusses “Small Data” Digital Humanities

On Tuesday, September 20, as part of the 15th Annual Belmont University Humanities Symposium, Dr. Amy Earhart,  Associate Professor of English at Texas A&M University, presented, “An Ethical Digital Humanities: Small Scale Approaches to Inclusive DH Projects.” As Dr. Earhart noted, the digital humanities has, as a field, been critiqued for high cost, huge projects that are often exclusionary by their structure, cost, technology application, and content. She discussed the limitations of such approaches to digital humanities projects and charted a long history of low entry point, accessible digital approaches—what she calls “small data” digital humanities.  Her talk can be viewed below:

English Faculty and Students Talk Tech at Recent Symposium

Belmont English faculty members played numerous contributing roles in the recent 15th Annual Belmont University Humanities Symposium.  The event, which ran from September 19-26, was titled Titled “Machines Made of Words: Technology, Progress, and the Humanities.” The week-long event sparked a range of conversations about our place as humans in relation to the many technologies around us. Central planning roles were taken on by Dr. David Curtis (symposium) and Dr. Maggie Monteverde (associated film festival), both professors in the English Department. English faculty and graduate students who delivered presentations included the following:

  • ENGAGING “SMART” MACHINES: AI, VR & THE HUMANITIES, panel presentation including Dr. Joel Overall.
  • SHAKESPEARE: FROM ON STAGE TO ONLINE, panel presentation by Dr. Marcia McDonald, Dr. Jayme Yeo and Dr. Joel Overall.
  • THE GREAT GROWLING ENGINE OF CHANGE: VIEWING THE EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY THROUGH LITERATURE, graduate student reading featuring Alyssa Wynans, Grace Miller, Aleks Kojadinovic, and Hannah McIntosh.
  • WHY THINGS MATTER: BEING POSTHUMAN IN THE HUMANITIES, presentation by Dr. Jason Lovvorn.
  • MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN—AND HER MONSTERS, presentation by Dr. David Curtis.
  • “WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE”…YET, viewing and discussion moderated by Dr. Maggie Monteverde.
  • LANGUAGE: ‘THE UNIVERSAL AND BIOLOGICALLY SPECIFIC’ TECHNOLOGY, presentation by Dr. Maggie Monteverde.
  • THERE’S NOT AN APP FOR THAT: WELLNESS, WRITING AND WALKING IN THE DIGITAL AGE, co-presentation including Dr. Bonnie Smith Whitehouse.
  • PRACTICING RESURRECTION: WENDELL BERRY, THE HUMANITIES AND THE PROBLEMATICS OF ELECTRIC WIRE AND SCREENS, presentation by Dr. Annette Sisson.
  • DIGITAL COMPOSING WORKSHOP, conducted by Dr. Joel Overall.
  • 2015 SANDRA HUTCHINS HUMANITIES SYMPOSIUM WRITING COMPETITION READING AND CELEBRATION OF WINNING ENTRIES, moderated by Dr. Gary McDowell and Dr. Susan Finch.
  • SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP: REFLECTING ON TECHNOLOGY AND THE HUMANITIES, moderated by Dr. David Curtis and Dr. Maggie Monteverde.

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Belmont English Student News

English Majors Interview Shakespeare Acting Company

thumb_the_nashville_shakespeare_festivalStudents in Dr. Marcia McDonald’s Shakespeare class interviewed the cast and crew of the Nashville Shakespeare Festival‘s Comedy of Errors on Thursday, September 23rd. The interviews were conducted as part of a project to create an online archive of local Shakespeare productions. Dr. Joel Overall and MA in English graduate student Alyssa Wynans assisted the students during the interviews. The archive will be housed by Belmont University’s library and is funded by a grant from the Folger Shakespeare Library in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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 Graduate Students Present at Humanities Symposium

Alyssa Wynans, Hannah McIntosh, Aleksandra Kojadinovic, and Grace Miller presented on the evolution of technology in the humanities at the Belmont University Humanities Symposium. Their papers covered the relationship between technologies and humans in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from online Shakespeare fanfiction to the impact of media and technological devices on self-image and relationships.

English Faculty Talk Digital Humanities

bookIn conjunction with the upcoming Belmont University Humanities Symposium on connections between humanity and technology, four English faculty will present as part of a colloquium series on Digital Humanities. The guiding structure for the talks will come from Amy E. Earhart’s online monograph, Traces of the Old, Uses of the New: The Emergence of Digital Literary StudiesEach faculty member will tackle a different chapter of the work as s/he highlights some of the main issues connected to DH.  All four presentations will take place at 10 a.m. in JAAC 3058.

  • August 26 – Dr. David Curtis will present “Early DH: Textual Studies Goes High Tech”
  • September 2 – Dr. Joel Overall will present “Ernest Hemingway is Kanye West: Redefining Authors Through Archives”
  • September 9 – Professor Sue Trout will present “How the 90s ALMOST Changed the Literary Canon: Revolution vs Clickbait”
  • September 16 – Dr. Jason Lovvorn will present “Seeing is Believing: Textual Analysis, Digital Tools, Visual Rhetoric”

English Graduate Students Present at Multiple Conferences

From Dr. Jayme Yeo, Director of Graduate Studies in English…

Belmont English graduate students are traveling the nation presenting their work at conferences! In September, Carmen Watts gave a paper on high-school writing centers to the Tennessee Council for Teachers of English in Nashville, while Paul Spilburg, Meredith Harrell, Alyssa Wynans, and Carmen Watts presented at our very own Belmont Humanities Symposium. Lacey Lamberth and Alan Tucker read their work at the Mardi Gras Conference in Louisiana in February. In March, Amanda Salmon will present on Lysistrata and Hannah Horvath at the Global Status of Women and Girls conference in Virginia, and Taylor Irwin, Jamey Woods, and Colleen McClintock will read their work at the Unstable Identities conference at UNC Greensboro. In April, Alyssa Wynans will present on Shakespeare and Tumblr at the Shakespeare and Our Times conference at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. And Hannah McIntosh will present at the Crime and Criminality conference at University of South Carolina. Congrats to all of our graduate students for their outstanding work!

Belmont English Faculty and Students Serve Humanities Symposium

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Belmont English faculty members contributed greatly to the planning and execution of the 14th Annual Belmont University Humanities Symposium.  The event, which ran from September 28 to October 5, centered on the theme of food.  Titled “Many Tables Fayre: Cuisine in Culture and Community,” the week-long symposium involved  thirty-seven events, including individual presentations, panel presentations, a cooking class, service activities, a writing workshop, and a creative writing contest.

The planning committee for the event included several Belmont English faculty: Dr. Jason Lovvorn (chair), Professor Sue Trout, Dr. Maggie Monteverde, and Dr. Annette Sisson. English faculty, graduate students, and students who delivered presentations included the following:

  • “Country’s Kitchen: Country Singers and Their Cookbooks,” Dr. Sarah Blomeley
  • “The Stories Supermarkets Tell,” Panel:  Dr. Douglas Murray, Dr. Marcia McDonald, and Dr. Charmion Gustke
  • “Seeking a Small, Good Thing: A Non-Foodie Bakes Bread,” Dr. Linda Holt
  • “The Burguerillas: Finding the Best Burger in the World,” Panel, including from English: Dr. Joel Overall, Dr. Jayme Yeo, Dr. Jason Lovvorn, Dr. Robbie Pinter, Dr. Susan Finch
  • “Heroes of the Belly:  Odysseus and Falstaff,”Dr. Marcia McDonald
  • “Heroic Feasting,”Dr. Maggie Monteverde
  • “Rhythm is Originally the Rhythm of the Feet,” Dr. Gary McDowell
  • “Turning the Tables: Exploring Animosity and Deception when Dining with Enemies,” Graduate Student Panel: Meredith Harrell, Paul Spilburg, Carmen Watts, Alyssa Wynans
  • “When Good Food Goes Bad:  Food, Race, and Gender in Southern Literature,” Student Panel: Taylor Herald, Alex Mitchell, and Rachel Bryan
  • “Eating Well: Agriculture and Place, Community and Progress, Wendell Berry and Thomas Hardy,” Dr. Annette Sisson
  • “The PAN Is Mightier than The Sword:  Cooking as an Act of Resistance,” Professor Sue Trout
  • “Saints and Seekers: Embodying Spirituality through Bread, Wine, and Sustainability,” Dr. Robbie Pinter
  • Pedagogy Via Pancakes, The Collaborative for Collegiality, including Dr. Bonnie Smith Whitehouse (English)
  • “Writing about Food” Workshop,” Professor Sue Trout and Dr. Jason Lovvorn
  • 2015 Sandra Hutchins Humanities Symposium Writing Competition, Dr. Gary McDowell and Dr. Susan Finch
  • Symposium Wrap-Up: Reflecting on Cuisine in Culture and Community, Humanities Symposium Committee, including from English, Dr. Jason Lovvorn, Dr. Maggie Monteverde, Dr. Annette Sisson, Professor Sue Trout

Click here for complete program:  2015 Humanities Symposium Program

Monteverde Organizes Film Festival

maggie-monteverdeAs a lead up to the food-related 14th Annual Belmont University Humanities Symposium, Dr. Maggie Monteverde, Professor of English, has organized an International Food Film Festival, to be held September 14 through September 27.  The two-week event will feature ten films with food themes at their center and will offer subsequent discussions and convocation credits for students. The films will include:  Ratatouille, Eat Drink Man Woman, Bella Martha, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, Julie and Julia, Like Water for Chocolate, Babette’s Feast, Big Night, Chocolat, and Chef.   Click below for a schedule of showings.

PDF schedule of events: Belmont University International Food Film Festival