Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s Hamlet at the Troutt Theater

By Victoria Pan

Let’s be honest. I don’t have to try my hardest to convince anybody reading this blog in their spare time to go see a Shakespeare production. We all know how important it is to support the arts. We all can imagine what a difficult job it is to make Shakespearean language flow off our modern tongues and seem as alive and fresh as it was and still should be. We all know how difficult it is, in these days where I can pick any show I want from halfway across the globe (not just the Globe itself), thanks to the Internet, to keep audiences’ attention riveted on plays that no longer really need spoiler alerts. Especially audiences composed of elementary, middle, and high schoolers, which the poor folks at the Nashville Shakespeare Festival have been saddled with entertaining every day for the past two or three weeks.

Image result for winter shakespeare nashville hamlet images

Despite all those budding Shakespeareans, this is not a watered-down production of Hamlet. Sure, this is not the place for anything too avant-garde, but it’s still Hamlet in all of its cerebral, philosophical glory. I could tell you about how masterful Sam Ashdown is as a Hamlet, and how he uses all of his not-inconsiderable energy to bring the full force of Hamlet’s conflict between emotion and reason to the stage. I could tell you about how urgent a production this is, how gripping and driven and tangled it is with all those competing ambitions. I could tell you how unexpectedly funny it is in its wittiest moments, and how tickled you’ll be once you realize you recognize some of Belmont’s own professors in the cast, if you’re familiar with our theater department.

I could tell you about how, even though I’ve read Hamlet countless times from middle school to college, as someone who knows some of those lines by heart (I’ve written on them! Multiple times!), I still felt tears threatening to spill by the end of the play.

But that’s beside the point. Continue reading “Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s Hamlet at the Troutt Theater”

“Paterson”: Poetry of the Pedestrian

by Manuel Lagos

Each evening, in his neat blue work jacket lunchbox swinging with each stride, he walks back from work at the bus station. He rights the crooked mailbox in his yard, and enters the little house he calls home. Inside awaits his wife and their dog.


“Hello, sweetie.” She says, curly hair askew, the smell of fresh paint filling the house.  “Hello, honey.” He replies. He is Paterson.


“Paterson” shows a week in the life of Paterson (Adam Driver), a bus driver in Paterson, N.J., who keeps a secret notebook full of poetry. Every workday begins with Paterson waking up next to his wife, Laura (Golshifteh Farahani) and checking his watch. Each workday ends with Paterson walking his English bulldog, Marvin, and popping into the local bar for a beer.

Continue reading ““Paterson”: Poetry of the Pedestrian”